How is NSW growing? Part 3: Sydney’s employment growth 1996 to 2006

In my last post I looked at the snapshot of Sydney’s 33 largest employment centres provided by the NSW Transport Data Centre (TDC) in its Employment and Commuting in Sydney’s Centres, 1996 – 2006, based on the Metropolitan Strategy centres hierarchy. The TDC report also discussed employment growth in the period 1996 to 2006, which is the topic of this post (note: the qualifications about the data I mentioned in my previous post also apply to the statistics below).

 

The report shows 71,350 new jobs were created in Sydney between 2001 and 2006, with 26,600 (37%) of these jobs in centres. There was a growth rate of 4% for both employment centres and the Sydney statistical division (SD) generally. However, employment grew much faster between 1996 and 2001, when it increased in centres grew by 13% and across the Sydney SD by 9%.

 

As I said earlier, whilst the TDC report is a great metro-wide overview, digging deeper on a regional basis provides another perspective. To do this I restructured the graph in the TDC report showing centres growth in the 1996 to 2001 and 2001 to 2006 periods into two graphs for eastern and Western Sydney (graphs 1 and 2) and a summary table for the period 2001 to 2006 (table 1). This affirms the extent to which growth rates slowed in 2001 to 2006 across both regions, but also reveals that there was considerable variation between eastern and Western Sydney.

 

Graph 1:

 

east_sydney_empl_96_06

 

Graph 2:west_sydney_empl_96_06

TABLE 1: SYDNEY EMPLOYMENT GROWTH BY REGION SUMMARY, 2001-2006

Source: based on NSW Transport Data Centre data

Region/Location

% Growth

% of Sydney Growth

Eastern Sydney*

 

 

 

Sydney CBD

5.1%

15.6%

 

Other centres

-0.4%

-1.9%

 

Centres total

1.8%

13.8%

 

Outside centres

3.1%

23.9%

 

Eastern Sydney Total

2.4%

37.7%

 

Western Sydney**

 

 

 

Parramatta

0.5%

0.2%

 

Other centres

16.6%

23.3%

 

Centres total

12.5%

23.6%

 

Outside centres

3.1%

18.9%

 

Western Sydney Total

5.4%

42.5%

 

Sydney

 

 

 

Sydney centres total

3.9%

37.3%

 

Outside centres total

3.1%

42.8%

 

Total

3.4%

80.2%

 

No location

 

 

 

No fixed address

5.8%

6.0%

 

Unknown

22.8%

28.7%

 

No location total

15.1%

34.7%

 

Discrepancy between centres and LGA data

-68.9%

-14.9%

 

Sydney SD

3.9%

100.0%

 

* Eastern Sydney – all Sydney LGAs outside Greater Western Sydney

** Western Sydney – the 14 LGAs comprising Greater Western Sydney

 

In both regions and most centres there was strong growth between 1996 and 2001. However in 2001 to 2006 the pattern diverged. In eastern Sydney the CBD grew by over 5% and centres such as Ultimo/Pyrmont, Macquarie Park, Rhodes, Randwick and Sydney Airport also experienced considerable growth. Meanwhile other areas such as Surry Hills/Kings Cross, St Leonards/Crows Nest and South Sydney lost jobs. Overall, centre-based employment grew by only 1.8% and growth was higher outside the centres than within them in eastern Sydney.

 

The story in Western Sydney was quite different. Employment growth across GWS centres in the period 2001 to 2006 of 12.5% was much stronger than the average in eastern Sydney centres and stronger than employment growth overall in the Sydney SD. It was also stronger than in areas outside the main employment centres.

 

This growth was also more widely spread across the key centres. Only Wetherill Park showed a significant loss, although Bankstown decreased marginally. Norwest, Eastern Creek, Castle Hill, Olympic Park, Westmead, Huntingwood and Campbelltown experienced much stronger growth. Unlike eastern Sydney where the CBD experienced strong growth, there was only a marginal increase in employment in Sydney’s second CBD, Parramatta.

 

All this would seem to suggest that strategies to concentrate employment are having more success in Western Sydney. However, there are some major qualifications. The increase in employment in the GWS centres has come off a very low base, with the result that centres-based employment still makes up only 25.3% of all employment in the region and a mere 7.8% of Sydney’s overall employment. Furthermore, much of this growth has occurred in centres such as Norwest and Castle Hill which are very poorly served by public transport (Norwest alone accounted for 37% of the growth in centre-based employment in Western Sydney).

 

In the next few posts I’ll consider the relationship of employment to population growth and the resulting transport implications.

This entry was posted in Employment, Growth, Planning, Population, Sydney metro area, Western Sydney and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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